DAIRY-FREE SPINACH SOUP

DAIRY-FREE SPINACH SOUP

Healthily cooked spinach soup to enjoy the goodness of green spinach leaves

 Category – Indian

COOKING TIME

15  mins

LEVEL

EASY

CALORIES

185 kcal per serving

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup chopped fresh spinach
  • 1/4th tsp vegetable oil
  • ½ medium onion finely chopped
  • 2 to 3 pods of garlic finely chopped
  • 300ml vegetable stock
  • ½ lemon’s juice
  • Italian spices (optional)
  • Pinch of cinnamon powder
  • Salt to taste
  • Black pepper to taste
  • Butter (optional)

DIRECTIONS 

BENEFITS

TIPS

FOR SELECTION & STORAGE

  • Look for fresh looking spinach that is medium to dark green in color, free from evidence of decay.
  • It should be stored loosely packed in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge where it will keep for about two days.
  • Do not wash spinach before storing, as the moisture will cause it to spoil, although do ensure it is washed properly before consumption and before chopping as the leaves and stems may collect soil and chemicals.

FOR PREPARING & COOKING

For cooking, opt for steaming, sautéeing or microwaving spinach rather than boiling to preserve the nutrients.

NUTRITIONAL VALUES

  • Spinach is an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids), folate, magnesium, iron, copper, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, vitamin E, calcium, potassium and vitamin C.
  • It is a very good source of dietary fiber, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, protein and choline. Additionally, spinach is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, niacin, Zinc and selenium.

CAUTION

Spinach is an incredibly very healthy food. However, it may cause adverse effects in some individuals.

  • Kidney Stones

Spinach is also associated with an increased risk of kidney stones, but only in people who are predisposed to the condition.

  • Blood Clotting

Spinach contains very high amounts of vitamin K1.

Vitamin K1 serves several functions in the body, but is best known for its role in blood clotting.

People who are taking blood-thinners, such as warfarin, may want to closely monitor their vitamin K intake.

  • Digestive troubles:

Spinach is high in oxalic acid, which can bind with iron and calcium and cause your body to absorb less of these nutrients. Consuming foods rich in vitamin C, such as tomatoes, capsicum, lemon juice or orange juice along with spinach can aid this absorption. Spinach is high in fibre, but too much of it can cause digestive problems such as bloating, gas and cramping.

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